Sources and influences

In the interest of transparency about what sources influence my writing, I’ve bill of materials for the websites that I most frequently cite. I don’t quite know what you can learn from this list, but it might reveal hidden agendas and unconscious bias.

Top sources in the 200 most recent articles

  1. w3.org
  2. mozilla.org
  3. freedesktop.org
  4. docs.microsoft.com
  5. torproject.org
  6. theverge.com
  7. apple.com
  8. man7.org
  9. google.com
  10. chromium.org
  11. apache.org
  12. developer.apple.com
  13. webkit.org
  14. whatwg.org
  15. gnome.org
  16. microsoft.com
  17. youtube.com
  18. europa.eu
  19. kde.org
  20. googlesource.com

All time top sources

  1. mozilla.org
  2. google.com
  3. docs.microsoft.com
  4. microsoft.com
  5. w3.org
  6. gnome.org
  7. freedesktop.org
  8. apache.org
  9. europa.eu
  10. apple.com
  11. play.google.com
  12. ietf.org
  13. wordpress.org
  14. windows.com
  15. youtube.com
  16. theverge.com
  17. torproject.org
  18. brave.com
  19. archive.org
  20. developer.mozilla.org
  21. getnikola.com
  22. blog.google
  23. flattr.com
  24. opera.com
  25. statcounter.com
  26. developers.google.com
  27. github.com/mozilla
  28. webkit.org
  29. googlesource.com
  30. googleblog.com
  31. theregister.com
  32. chromium.org
  33. debian.org
  34. developer.apple.com
  35. ubuntu.com
  36. builtwith.com
  37. sourceforge.net
  38. kde.org
  39. redhat.com
  40. arstechnica.com
  41. github.com/brave
  42. nginx.org
  43. man7.org
  44. bunny.net
  45. wired.com
  46. whatwg.org
  47. lenovo.com
  48. quad9.net
  49. readability.com
  50. eff.org
  51. qubes-os.org
  52. httparchive.org
  53. urn:ietf:rfc:5861
  54. urn:ietf:rfc:4287
  55. tp-link.com
  56. yandex.com
  57. lastpass.com
  58. instapaper.com
  59. mailbox.org
  60. developer.android.com
  61. bing.com
  62. firewalld.org
  63. docs.ipfs.io
  64. ipfs.io
  65. urn:ietf:rfc:7231
  66. bittorrent.org
  67. adobe.com
  68. bbc.com
  69. developer.microsoft.com
  70. steampowered.com
  71. html-tidy.org
  72. torrentfreak.com
  73. intel.com
  74. github.com/rpm-software-management
  75. chromestatus.com
  76. cloudflare.com
  77. gnu.org
  78. pumabrowser.com
  79. venturebeat.com
  80. windowscentral.com
  81. mikrotik.com
  82. nytimes.com
  83. microformats.org
  84. github.com/ipfs
  85. urn:ietf:rfc:7234
  86. creativecommons.org
  87. wikipedia.org
  88. cockpit-project.org
  89. letsencrypt.org
  90. developer.chrome.com
  91. tranco-list.eu
  92. phoronix.com
  93. developer.twitter.com
  94. kernel.org
  95. spotify.com
  96. f-droid.org
  97. github.com/Automattic
  98. github.com/rhinstaller
  99. wordpress.com
  100. developers.cloudflare.com

Link rot statistics

Ctrl blog automatically submits all external links to the Internet Archive at the time of publishing. This means that links can be updated to point to the Internet Archive when the original website that published them removes the page.

Currently, 11,7 % of links on Ctrl blog point to the archived version because the original link is no longer available.

Link rot is preventable! Ctrl blog acts on and updates links to permanent redirects. The primary reason for link rot is websites that re-architect and change page-addresses without redirecting the old address to the new address. Care for your old URLs if you really need to change them!

Thanks to the Internet Archive for providing its incalculably valuable service. Please consider donating to support its work!

Algorithmic transparency

Domains are scored +1 for the first link in an article, and +0,25 per additional link in the same article. Each link is counted once per article.